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What is the LHC Trying to Accomplish?

What is the LHC Trying to Accomplish?

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the most complex physics experiment ever constructed. Located underground, straddling the French-Swiss border, the 27 km-long ring of electromagnets is designed to accelerate protons and heavier charged particles to speeds close to that of the speed of light. The LHC is located at, and managed by, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN).

INTERVIEW: What is the LHC? What does it do? What is the Higgs Boson? Discovery News Editor-in-Chief Lori Cuthbert discusses the Large Hadron Collider with Space Producer Ian O’Neill to nail the basics about the LHC.

As of March 30, 2010, the LHC began high energy collisions, attaining collision energies of 7 TeV, three times higher than ever before.
What will it do?
At strategic points around the accelerator ring, counter-rotating “beams” of accelerated particles are steered to collide head-on by the most precise electromagnet technology on Earth. At these collision points, huge particle detectors are located to track and measure the resulting high-speed smash-up.

When the LHC runs at full capacity, the energy conditions shortly after the Big Bang will be recreated for a very short period of time. This is the reason why the LHC is often dubbed the “Big Bang machine.”

Making these highly controlled mini-Big Bangs allow physicists to have a glimpse at what our universe is made of, creating particles that the universe hasn’t seen since its birth, 13.75 billion years ago.

WIDE ANGLE: The LHC has the potential to revolutionize modern physics, but what precisely are physicists hunting for and what technology are they using to help them?
What will it discover?
The LHC will probe the limits of physics theory, possibly turning up evidence for the elusive Higgs boson or uncovering the nature of mysterious “dark matter” that is thought to dominate the cosmos. It is, however, the Higgs boson that is the prime focus of the particle accelerator’s mission.

The Higgs boson is the “exchange particle” that is theorized to give stuff mass.

Without the Higgs particle, the universe cannot exist, but if the Higgs particle isn’t discovered by the LHC, it means our understanding of how the universe works is wrong. The non-discovery of the Higgs would be as profound as its discovery, potentially revolutionizing physics.

INTERVIEW: What happens if the LHC doesn’t find the Higgs particle? Perhaps the universe has something more exotic in store, a prospect that excites LHC physicist Prof. Jon Butterworth.
What’s the plan?
By the end of March 2010, LHC scientists hope to push accelerated protons to record-breaking speeds, topping an energy of 7 trillion electron volts (an electron volt — or eV — is a unit of energy used by physicists when describing the kinetic energy of subatomic particles).

The LHC initially broke the world record in November 2009 when accelerating protons to an energy of 1.18TeV. 7TeV will be 3.5 times more powerful than its nearest competitor, Fermilab’s Tevatron in Batavia, Ill.

As this experiment is very complex, long periods of “down time” are required for CERN scientists and engineers to upgrade and repair the “Big Bang machine.” Although a recent BBC article alluded to some kind of unexpected shutdown at the end of 2011 for a year, this is actually standard operating procedure.

According to a March 10, 2010, CERN press release:

Traditionally, CERN has operated its accelerators on an annual cycle, running for seven to eight months with a four- to five-month shutdown each year. With the LHC, things are different. Being a cryogenic machine operating at very low temperature, the LHC takes about a month to bring up to room temperature and another month to cool down. A four-month shutdown as part of an annual cycle no longer makes sense for such a machine. That’s why CERN decided at the end of January 2010 to move to a longer cycle with longer periods of operation accompanied by longer shutdown periods when needed.

So, the LHC is scheduled to run at half power until the end of 2011 when it will be upgraded to operate at full capacity.

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Filed under: Article of Week, General Knowledge, ,

CBSE dispatches CCE syllabi for classes IX, X

CBSE dispatches CCE syllabi for classes IX, X

New Delhi: The Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) has recently announced the bifurcated syllabi for the main subjects under the Continuous and Comprehensive Evaluation (CCE) system for classes IX and X both for the first term (April to September, 2010) and second term (October to 31 March, 2011).

Although, detailed guidelines for formative and summative assessment in main subjects and sample question papers will be sent by the CBSE to the schools later while they have received the syllabi for the next academic session for classes IX and X.

The summative assessment includes overall assessment of the term while the formative assessment includes scholastic and non-scholastic activities.

“These documents will be helpful to your teachers in designing creative activities and lesson plans for transacting syllabus and assessing students effectively during the academic session effective from April 1, 2010,” said the circular including the syllabi disseminated to all the heads of the CBSE affiliated schools.

Filed under: CBSE Continuous and Comprehensive Evaluation Resource, ,

Keeping yourself clean may pollute the environment

Keeping yourself clean may pollute the environment

Shower

Knowing the source of pollution is an important first step toward preventing further contamination.
Getty Images

THE GIST:

  • Taking showers and doing laundry could wash pharmaceuticals into the water supply.
  • Babies and people with compromised immune systems could be most at risk.
  • Although the health consequences are still unclear, knowing the source of pollution could help reduce its impact.


With every shower you take, you may be unwittingly polluting the environment.

As you scrub off dirt, you also wipe off medicines from your skin and pharmaceuticals excreted in sweat, according to a new study. Those chemicals pass through the sewage system and might even end up in our drinking water.

“We are raising an alarm in that pharmaceuticals are not meant to be in our water,” said Ilene Ruhoy, director of the Institute for Environmental Medicine at the Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson, Nev. She presented her work this week at the American Chemical Society meeting in San Francisco.

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“If you think about other people exposed to these drugs that are intended for a particular population,” she said, “that could be a concern.”

Scientists have already recognized toilets as the biggest source of pharmaceuticals in the environment. After swallowing and digesting medicines, our bodies excrete metabolized versions of them through urine and feces. Often, people flush unwanted or unused pills as well, without thinking about where the drugs will end up.

Ruhoy suspected that toilets weren’t the only way that pharmaceuticals escape from the medicine cabinet. For the first time, she and colleagues considered overlooked sources of drugs in the environment.

Their research revealed that human skin fails to absorb much of the medicine that is applied topically, such as antibiotic ointments and steroid creams. Showers, baths and laundry wash those drugs directly into the sewage system. Chemically, these compounds often remain whole, unlike the broken-down versions in feces and urine.

The scientists also found that a significant percentage of the medicine we swallow end up coming out in our sweat. Those chemicals go down the drain, too.

It’s not yet clear how pharmaceutical residues in the environment will affect the health of animals or people, especially because concentrations for now are low. Still, tiny doses can add up after years and years of exposure. It’s a phenomenon that scientists have become increasingly worried about.

Studies have already found female features, such as eggs, in male fish that live near sewage effluents. Among the concerns, the migration of antibiotics into the environment could lead to more drug-resistant infections. Babies and people with compromised immune systems would be most at risk.

“There’s potential for an incredible number of compounds to be entering the environment, and we don’t really know what mixtures of those chemicals can do, either individually or together,” said Michael Fulton, an environmental toxicologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Charleston, S.C.

“Work is really just sort of beginning,” he added, “to try and identify what compounds are getting into the environment in high enough concentrations to produce an effect in some animal living out there.”

Knowing where pollution is coming from is an important first step toward preventing it from entering the environment in the first place, Ruhoy said. She recommends using the minimal necessary dose of topical ointments instead of slathering them on. Precautionary measures like wiping down with a towel before stepping into the shower might help, too.

“Let’s just be aware that what we do has an effect on the environment,” she said. “The environment and human health are intricately connected.”

Filed under: Article of Week, Climate/Environment, , ,

The Library Minute: Student Book Collecting Contest

Filed under: Library Activities,

Geographical Sobriquets

Surname Name
Bengal’s Sorrow Damodar River
Blue Mountains Nilgiri Hills
City of Sky-scrapers New York
City of Seven Hills Rome
City of Dreaming Spires Oxford
City of  palaces Kolkata
City of Golden Gate San Francisco
City of Magnificent Buildings Washington D.C.
City of Eternal Springs Quito(S.America)
China’s Sorrow Hwang Ho
Cockpit of Europe Belgium
Dark Continent Africa
Emerald Isle Ireland
Eternal City Rome
Empire City New York
Forbidden City Lhasa (Tibet)
Garden City Chicago
Gate of Tears Strait of Bab-el Mandeb
Gateway  of India Mumbai
Gift of the Nile Eqypt
Granite City Aberdeen (Scotland)
Hermit Kingdom Korea
Herring Pond Atlantic Ocean
Holy Land Jerusalem
Island Continent Australia
Island of Cloves Zanzibar
Isle of Pearls Bahrein (Peesian Gulf)
Key of the Mediterranean Gibralter
Land of Cakes Scotland
Land of Golden Fleece Australia
Land of Maple Leaf Canada
Land of Midnight Sun Norway
Land of the Thousand Lakes Finland
Land of the Thunderbolt Bhutan
Land of white Elephant Thailand
Land of Five Rivers Punjab
Land of Thousand Elephants Laos
Land of Rising Sun Japan
Loneliest Island Tristan De Gunha (Mid-Atlantic)
Manchester of Japan Osaka
Pillars of Hercules Strait of Gibraltar
Pearl of the Antilles Cuba
Playground of Europe Switzerland
Quaker City Philadelphia
Queen of the Adriatic Venice
Roof of the World The Pamirs
Rose Pink City Jaipur
Sugar bowl of the World Cuba
Venice of the North Stockholm
Windy City Chicago
Whirteman’s grave Guinea Coast of Africa
Yellow River Huang Ho (China)

Filed under: General Knowledge,

SPORTS AND THE TERMS ASSOCIATED WITH THEM

Badminton
Angled Drive Serve, Backhand Low Serve, Bird, Deuce, Double Droup, Fault, Flick Serve, Forehand Smash, Let, Lob, Love All, net Shots, Rush, Smash.
Baseball
Base, Battery, Bunting, Catcher, Diamond, Hitter, Home Infield, Outfield, Pinch, Pitcher Plate, Pullout, Short Stop, Strike.
Basketball
Ball, Basket, Blocking, Dribbling, Free Throw, Held Ball, Holding, Jump Ball, Multiple Throws, Pivot.
Billiards
Baulk Line, Break, Bolting, Cannon, Cue, Hazard, In-off, Jigger, Long jenney, Pot, Scratch, Screw Back, short Stop, Strike.
Boxing
Ausiliary Point System, Babit Punch, Break, Cut, Defence, Down, Hook, Jab, Lying On, Knock, Seconds out, Slam, Upper Cut, Weight In, Win by Knock-out.
Bridge
Auction, Bid, Chicane, Cut, Declarer, Doubleton, Dummy, Finesse, Grand Slam, Little Slam, Notrumps, Over-trick, Revoke, rubber, Ruff, Shuffle, Suit, Vulnerable.
Chess
Bishop, Capture, Castling, Checkmate, En Passant, Gambit, Grand Master, King, Knight, Pawn, Queen, Rook, Stalemate, Under Promoting.
Cricket
Ashes, Banana, Boundary, Bowling, Caught, Chinaman, Cover Drive, Crease, Doosra, Duck, Duckworth-Lewis Rule, Fine Leg, Follow On, Full Toss, Gardening, Googly, Gully, Hat-trick, Hit Wicket, Inswinger, l.b.w., Leg-break, Leg-bye, Leg Glance, late Cut, maiden Over, No Ball, Off Break, On Drive, Out, Outswinger, Over, Mandatory Over, over Pitch, Popping Crease, Rubber, Run Down, Run Out, Short Pitch, Silly Point, Slip, Square Leg, Stone Walling, Straight Drive, Stumped, Short leg, Spin, Swing, Thirdman, Yorker.
Croquet
Hoops, Mallet, Peg Out.
Draughts
Huff
Football
Advantage Clause, Blind Side, Centre Forward, Corner Kick, Dead Ball, Direct Free Kick, Dribble, Goal kick, Golden Goal, Hat-trick, Marking, OffSide, Penalty Kick, Penalty Shootout, Red Card, Striker, Throw In, Tripping.
Golf
Best-ball Foursome, Bogey, Bunker, Caddie, Dormy, Fairway, Fourball, Foursome, Greed Holes, Links, Niblic, Par, Put, Rough, Stymied, Tee, Threesome.
Gymnastics
A-bars, Ariel, Blocks, Cone of Swing, Dish, Flairs, Giants, Inlocate, Kip, Planche, Tariff, Tumble, Virtuosity, Wrap.
Hockey
Advantage, Back-stick, Bully, Cary, Centre Forward, Corner, Dribble, Flick, Free-hit, Goal Line, Green Card, Halfway Line, Hat-trick, Off-side, Red Car, Roll -in, Scoop, Short Corner, Sixteen-yard hit, Square Pass, Stick, Striking Cirele, Tackle, Tie-breaker, Zonal Marking.
Horse Racing
Jockey, Punt, Steeplechase, Thorough Bred.
Judo
Ashi-waza, chui, Dan, Dojo, Gyaku, Hajime, Ippon, Jigotai, Kaeshiwaza, Koka, Makikomi, Nage-waza, O-goshi, Randori, Scarf, Tani-Otoshi, Uchi-komvi, Waki-gatame, Yoshi, Yuko.
Karate
Age Zuki, Ai-uchi, Aka, Chakugan, Dachi, Encho Sen, Fudotachi, Gedan, Geri, Hajime, Ibuki, Jion, Kakato, Koka, Makiwara, Nidan, Obi, Rei, Sanbon, Shiro, Tobigeri, Ude, Waza-ari, Yoko-geri, Zanshin, Zen-no.
Polo
Bunker, Chukker, Mallet.
Rowing
Bow, Bucket, Cow, Ergometer, Feather, Paddle, Regatta.
Rugby Football
A Trackle, Lines, Scrum, Touch, Try.
Shootng
Bag, Bull’s Eye, Marksmanship, Muzzle, Plug.
Skiing
Tobogganing.
Swimming
Breast Stroke, Crawl.
Table Tennis
Anti Loop, Backspin, Chop, Loop, Penhold Grip, Push, Spin, Twiddle.
Tennis
Ace, Backhand Stroke, Deuce, Deep Volley, Deuce, Double Fault, Fault, Ground Stroke, Half Volley, Let, Love, Slice, Smash, Volley
Volleyball
Ace, Base-line, Blocking, Doubling, Foot Fault, Heave, Holding, Jump Set, Lob Pass, Love All, Point, Quick Smash, Scouting, Service, Spike, Tactical Ball, Volley, Windmill Service.
Wrestling
Half-Nelson, Head Lock, Heave, Hold, Rebouts, Scissor.

Filed under: General Knowledge, ,

Civil Services Prelims exam replaced by Aptitude Test from 2011

New Delhi: The Union Public Service Commission (UPSC) has decided to overhaul the civil services examination from next year, as the aspirants are likely to face a different pattern of examination.

Replacing the existing preliminary examination which shortlisted candidates for the main exam, it will now be replaced with Civil Services Aptitude Test (CSAT), in which they will have to appear in two objective-type papers having special emphasis on testing their ‘aptitude for civil services’ as well as on ‘ethical and moral dimension of decision-making.’

Both these papers will be given equal weightage and will substitute the one common paper (general awareness) and one optional paper (any particular subject of choice) which emphasized on subject knowledge.

The change, as of now, will be effective only for the first stage of the Civil Services Examination (CSE) from next year onwards while the consequent stages, which are the CS (Main) Examination and interview, are unlikely to change until a committee of experts goes into various aspects of the entire system and submits its report.

“With regard to the CSE, the Prime Minister has approved the proposal for introduction of CSAT in place of the existing Civil Services (Preliminary) Examination,” said the minister of State in the Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances & Pensions, Prithviraj Chavan in a written reply to a question in Lok Sabha.

“The CSAT is expected to come into effect from CSE, 2011,” it added.

The UPSC which conducts CSE every year to select candidates for privileged all-India services, including IAS, IPS, IFS, IRS and others Group ‘A’ and Group ‘B’ central jobs, had sent a proposal to this effect to the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) last year.

“Various committees including the second Administrative Reforms Commission, in their reports submitted over the years suggested the changes and laid greater emphasis on the ‘aptitude’ of candidates than their knowledge of a subject,” said the officials.

The committees argued that specialists or experts in any particular subject might not necessarily be good civil servants.

Commenting on the introduction of CSAT in the recruitment process, the official said that, “Since all candidates will have to attempt common papers, the new system will be a field leveler unlike the existing format providing only one common paper.”

Filed under: Educational News,

World’s shortest railway reopens in Los Angeles

The world’s shortest railway, Angels Flight, reopened in Los Angeles after being out of service for nine years. The first Angels Flight operated from 1901. The service was closed for redeveloping the location in 1969. It was reopened in 1996 and had to be closed again in 2001 after a fatal accident.

Recreating1901 ! The world's shortest railway reopens in LA

Filed under: General Knowledge,

Battles and Wars-World Wars,Gulf war,Boer War

Battle of Marathon (490 B.C.)—This battle was fought between the Greeks and Persians in 490 B.C. A small Greek Army defeated much larger Persian force.

Battle of Hastings (1066 A.D.)—This war was fought between England and Normans in 1066 A.D. King Harold of England was defeated and England came under the Norman control.

‘Hundred Years’ War (1338-1453)—It was fought between France and England. The war was brought to an end by the sacrifice of Joan of Arc.

War between Henry VII and Richard (1455-85)—It was a civil war fought in 1455-85 between Henry VII and Richard (The Duke of York) both claiming the British throne on Henry VI’s death. Richard was defeated in this war.

Defeat of Spanish Armada (1588)—The British fleet defeated Spanish Armada. The British supremacy over the seas was established. Also, it led to renaissance in English life and literature.

Civil War in England (1642-49)—It was fought between the Parliament and Charles I of England.

War of Spanish Succession (1702)—It was fought between England and France in 1702. The latter were defeated.

Battle of Blenheim (1704)—England and Austria defeated the French and Bavarians.

Seven Years War (1756-63)—England and Prussia defeated Austria, France, Poland and Russia. It was caused by a revolutionary change in the diplomatic pattern.

American War of Independence (1776-83)—It was fought during 1776-1783. In this war, George Washington defeated the English forces and America became independent.

Battle of the Nile (1798)—A naval fight between British and French fleet in 1798. The British fleet commanded by Nelson was victorious.

Battle of Trafalgar (1805)—The British fleet under Nelson defeated the combined line of French and Spanish fleet.

Battle of Waterloo (1815)—The British under Duke of Wellington defeated Napolean. Napolean was captured and exiled to St. Helena where he died in 1821.

Crimean War (1854-56)—It was fought during 1854-56 between Russia and the combined forces of England, France and Turkey.

American Civil War (1861-65)—This was fought during 1861-65 between the Northern and Southern States of America.

Boer War (1889-1901)—This war was fought between British and Dutch forces in 1889-1901 in South Africa.

Sino Japanese War (1894-95)—Japan defeated China and occupied Formosa and Korea.

Russo-Japanese War (1904-05)—Also known as the Battle of the sea of Japan. The Japanese fleet defeated the Russian fleet. It led to the emergence of the wave of Asian resurgence.

World War I (1914-18)—The Allied Powers (Britain, France, U.S.A., Belgium) etc. defeated Germany and her associated powers.

World War II (1939-45)—The Allies (Britain, France, U.S.A. and Russia and Benelux countries etc. defeated the Axis Powers (Germany, Italy and Japan).

Battle of El-Alamein (1942)—The Allies Victory during the Second World War and retreat of Field Marshal General Rommel’s forces.

Korean War (1950-53)—It was fought between North and South Korea from 1950 to 1953 A.D.

4th Arab-Israel War (Oct. 1973)—An indecisive war led to Geneva Peace Conference on West Asia (Dec. 1973).

China-Vietnam War (Feb. 1979)—China invaded Vietnam and overran a large chunk of Vietnamese territory. It however, proclaimed ceasefire in the following month and withdrew its forces.

Iran-Iraq War (Oct. 1980-Aug. 1988)

Falkland War (1983)—It was fought between Britain and Argentina.

U.S.-Panama War (1989)—It was fought between United States and Panama.

Gulf War (Jan. 17, 1991-Feb. 26, 1991)—It was fought between multinational forces led by the U.S.A. and Iraq.

Gulf War-2 (March 20, 2003 to April 2003)—The US led coalition forces launched a full scale attack on Iraq on March 20, 2003. It made use of the latest and the fiercest weaponry to subdue the Iraqi forces. Baghdad fell on April 9, 10 and other cities followed suit. By April 20 the coalition armies were in full control of Iraq. It marked the downfall of President Saddam Hussein.

Filed under: General Knowledge, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

First Double Century in the history of One Day Cricket

Sachin Tendulkar celebrates his 200 at Gwalior, the first double century in the history of one-day internationals. Sachin’s classic 200 not out (off only 147 balls, 25×4, 3×6) at the Captain Roop Singh Stadium againg South Africa. He became the owner of highest score in one day international beating 194 runs of Saeed Anwar( Pak ).

Filed under: General Knowledge, , ,

Intel introduces Intel Core i7 processor

Intel Corp. has introduced its most advanced desktop processor ever, the Intel Core i7 processor. The core i7 processor is the first member of a new family of Nehalem processor designs and is the most sophisticated ever built with new technologies that boost performance on demand and maximise data throughput.

The Core i7 processor speeds video editing, immersive games and other popular internet and computer activities by up to 40 percent without increasing power consumption.

Each Core i7 processor features an 8 MB level 3 cache and 3 channels of DDR3 1006 memory to deliver the best memory performance of any desktop platform. Intel’s top performance processor, the Intel Core i7 Extreme Edition, also removes over-speed protection allowing Intel’ knowledgeable customers or hobbyists to further increase the chip speed.

Filed under: General Knowledge,

Buddhism and Buddha & The Vedas and Purans

1. Buddha was born at:
A. Pataliputra
B. Ujain
C. Rajgriha
D. Lumbini

Ans : D. Lumbini

2. Gautama Buddha attained Parinirvana at:
A. Lumbini
B. Vaishali
C. Sarnath
D. Kushinagar

Ans : D. Kushinagar

3. Which State is called the Cradle of Budhism?
A. Sikkim
B. Bihar
C. UP
D. MP

Ans : B. Bihar

4. Gautam Budha first preached his sermon at:
A. Lumbini
B. Prayag
C. Sarnath
D. Gaya

Ans : C. Sarnath

5. The one that can be called a Buddhist scripture is the:
A. Vedas
B. Aranyakas
C. Upanishads
D. Tripitakas

Ans : D. Tripitakas
6. The first discourse of Buddha at Der Parkin Sarnath is called:
A. Mahabhiniskraman
B. Mahaparinirvana
C. Mahamastakabhisheka
D. Dharmachakra Pravartana

Ans : D. Dharmachakra Pravartana

1. The oldest among the Vedas is the:
A. Sama Veda
B. Atharva Veda
C. Rig Veda
D. Yajur Veda
Ans. Rig Veda

2. The Rig Veda is a book on:

A. sacrificial prayers
B. praise of gods
C. mysticism and philosophy
D. political, social, and religious life of the people of vedic age

Ans: political, social, and religious life of the people of vedic age

3. Which one of the following contains the Gayatri Mantra?
A. Rig Veda
B. Yajur Veda
C. Upanishad
D. Aranyakas

Ans. Rig Veda

4. In the Rigveda one finds:

A. hymnsin praise of the gods
B. rituals to be practised by people
C. list of yagnas to be performed
D. all the above

Ans. hymnsin praise of the gods

5. The important divinities mentioned in the Rigveda are:
A. Indra, Aditi, Rudra
B. Agni, Siva, Vishnu
C. Prajapati, Varuna, Vishnu
D. Indra, Agni, Varuna

Ans.  Indra, Agni, Varuna

6. The Prose explanations of the Vedas were known as the:
A. Brahmanas
B. Samhitas
C. Aranyakas
D. Upanishads

Ans. Brahmanas

7. The poetical portion of the Vedas is known as:
A. Brahmana
B. Samhita
C. Aranyaka
D. Upanishada

Ans. Samhita

8. The Vedangas were _____ in number.
A. six
B. four
C. eight
D. ten

Ans. six

9. Which one of the following does not constitute part of the Veda?
A. Nirukta
B. Upanishad
C. Brahmana
D. Samhita

Ans. Nirukta

10. The Puranas are:
A. 4 in number
B. 7 in number
C. 10 in number
D. 18 in number

Ans. 18 in number

Filed under: General Knowledge, , , ,

First Infosys Prize

First Infosys prize:
Infosys prize has been instituted by Infosys to reward and recognise outstanding inventions or discovery or a cumulative body of work done in India in five major disciplines: engineering and computer science, life sciences, mathematical sciences, physical sciences and social sciences. Recently these awards were distributed.

Filed under: Awards,

50th Grammy Awards Winners

Record Of the Year: “Rehab”, Amy Winehouse

Album Of the Year: “River: The Joni Letters”, Herbie Hancock

Song Of the Year:  ”Rehab”, Amy Winehouse

Best New Artist:  Amy Winehouse

Best Hard Rock Performance: “The Pretender”, Foo Fighters

Best Metal Performance: “Final Six”, Slayer

Best Rock Song: “Radio Nowhere”, Bruce Springsteen

Best Alternative Music Album: “Icky Thump”, The White Stripes

Filed under: Awards, General Knowledge,

Heads of Various World organizations–Latest who’s who–Quiz

Heads of Various World organizations–Latest who’s who–Quiz
Here is an update of the heads of Various World organizations.
Secretary General, UN—Ban ki moon
Director General,WHO—Margarret Chan
Head, UNICEF—-Ann Veneman
Head, FAO—Jacqueous Diouff
Head,IAEA—Mohammed El Baradei
President, World Bank–Robert Zoellik
Managing Director, IMF–Dominique Strauss Kahn
Secretary General, NATO–Jaap De Hoop Scheffer
Secretary General,ASEAN–Surin Pitsuwan
Secretary General ,OPEC–Abdellah Salim El Badri
Chairman,SAARC—–Mahindra Rajapakse
Secretary General ,Commonwealth–Kamlesh Sharma

Latest Who’s Who in India

  1. Chief Election Commissioner of India: Navin Chawla
  2. Election Commissioner of India: VS Sampath
  3. Election commissioner of India: S Y Quraishi
  4. Chief Justice of India: KG Balakrishnan
  5. National Commission for Minorities: Mohammad Shaffi Qureshi
  6. Comptroller and Auditor General of India: Vinod Rai
  7. Governor of Reserve Bank of India: D. Subbarao
  8. Chairman, University Grants Commission: S K Thorat
  9. Chairman, Railway Board : S S Khurana
  10. Chief of National Investigation Agency : Radha Vinod Raju
  11. Solicitor General of India Gopal Subramaniam
  12. Attorney General of India : G E Vahanvati
  13. Director of the Intelligence Bureau: Rajiv Mathur
  14. Chairman State Bank of India : O P Bhatt
  15. Chairman Atomic Energy Commission of India &
  16. Secretary to the Government of India, Department of Atomic Energy: Anil Kakodkar
  17. Chairman Central Board of Excise and Customs: P.C. Jha
  18. President FICCI: Mr. Harsh Pati Singhania
  19. Chairman ISRO: K. Radhakrishnan
  20. Chairman Finance Commission of India &
  21. Chairman 13th Finance Commission: Dr. Vijay Kelkar
  22. Chairman Eighteenth Law Commission : Dr. Justice A R Lakshmanan
QUESTION ANSWER
CHIEF JUSTICE OF INDIA K.G BALAKRISHNAN
FIRST DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER OF INDIA SARDAR VALLABABHAI PATEL
FIRST LADY IPS OFFICER KIRAN BEDI
FIRST LADY CHIEF MINISTER SUCHETHA KRIPALANI
FIRST SPEAKER OF LOK SABHA GANESH S MAVALANKAR
THE ARCHITECT OF MODERN INDIA JAWAHARLAL NEHRU
FOUNDER OF ARYA SAMAJ DAYANAND SARASWATI
THE ” WISE FOOL ” OF INDIAN HISTORY MUHAMMAD BIN TUGLAQ
WHO BUILT TAJ MAHAL, RED FORT SHAH JAHAN
FIRST INDIAN MISS UNIVERSE SUSHMITHA SEN
FIRST UN SECRETARY GENERAL TRYGVE LEI
FIRST INDIAN SCIENTIST WON NOBEL PRIZE C.V RAMAN
FIRST PRESIDENT OF INC W.C BANERJEE
FIRST PERSON TO SET FOOT ON THE MOON NEIL ARMSTRONG
THE FIRST INDIAN TO ENTER SPACE RAKESH SHARMA
GRAND OLDMAN OF INDIA DADABHAI NAOROJI
NIGHTINGALE OF INDIA SAROJINI NAIDU
THE FIRST WOMAN WHO CONQUERED EVEREST JUNGO TABEI
KPSC CHAIRMAN K.V SALAHUDHEEN
FIRST INDIAN TO CROSS ENGLISH CHANNEL MIHIR SEN
WHO WROTE “ORIGIN OF SPECIES” CHARLES DARWIN
R.D BURMAN DISTINGUISHED HIMSELF IN MUSIC
WHO LED THE REVOLT OF 1857 AT KANPUR NANA SAHEB
FIRST WOMAN GOVERNOR IN INDIA SAROJINI NAIDU
WHO GAVE THE SLOGAN ” DO OR DIE “ MAHATMA GANDHI
IN INDIA RAILWAY WAS INTRODUCED BY DALHOUSIE
WHO STARTED BOY SCOUTS MOVEMENT BADEN POWELL
” LION OF THE PUNJAB “ LALA LAJPAT RAI
FOUNDER OF CHIPKO MOVEMENT SUNDARLAL BAHUGUNA
FIRST HEART TRANSPLANTATION IN INDIA VENUGOPAL
WHO STARTED BHOODAN MOVEMENT VINOBA BHAVE
WORLDS FIRST WOMAN PRIME MINISTER BANDARA NAIKE
KUNJALI MARAKAR WAS THE NAVAL CHIEF OF ZAMORIN OF KOZHIKODE
V.T BHATTATHIRIPAD WAS SOCIAL REFORMER
FIRST MALAYALAM ACTOR, WHO WON BHARATAWARD P.J ANTONY
COURT PHYSICIAN OF KING KANISHKA CHARAKA
ACTUAL NAME OF PEN NAME “KAKKANADAN” GEORGE VARGHESE
PRESIDENT OF NORTH KOREA MARSHAL KIM JONG IL
WHO WAS KNOWN AS KERALA GANDHI K.KELAPPAN
WHO DIRCTED THE FILM “CHEMMEEN” RAMU KARIAT
SALIM ALI WAS ASSOCIATED WITH ORNITHOLOGY
THE FIRST WOMAN PILOT IN INDIA PREM MATHUR
FIRST VICE PRESIDENT OF INDIA S RADHAKRISHNAN
FIRST CHIEF JUSTICE OF INDIA HARILAL J KANIA
FIRST CHIEF ELECTION COMMISSIONER OF INDIA SUKUMAR SEN
M.F HUSSAIN IS ASSOCIATED WITH PAINTING
FIRST INDIAN ICS OFFICER SATYENDRA NATH TAGORE
FIRST WOMAN JUDGE IN SUPREME COURT FATHIMA BIVI
FIRST FIELD MARSHAL MANEKSHAW
PARTITION OF BENGAL LORD CURZON
BARDOLI SATYAGRAHA IS ASSOCIATED WITH SARDAR VALLABAI PATEL
MONA LISA IS THE PAINTING OF LEONARDO DA VINCI
FIRST RECIPIENT OF BHARAT RATNA C.RAJAGOPALACHARI
MAGSAYSAY AWARD IS NAMED AFTER PHILIPPINES PRESIDENT
FIRST INDIAN GRAND MASTER IN CHESS V. ANAND
PEN NAME OF MALAYALAM WRITER “P.C KUTTIKRISHNAN” UROOB
NARMADA BACHAO ANDOLAN MEDHA PATKAR
SATYAJIT RAY BENGAL FILM
FATHER OF MALAYALAM CINEMA J.C DANIEL
DIRECTION OF “VASTHUHARA” ARAVINDAN
ARUNA ASAF ALI INDIAN FREEDOM FIGHTER
GANDHI CALLED HIM “PULAYARAJA” WHOM AYYANKALI
INDIAS YOUNGEST IIT STUDENT CHANDRA SEKAR
DOSTOEVSKY RUSSIAN NOVELIST
PRIME MINISTER OF AKBAR THE GREAT ABUL FAZAL
FATHER OF INDIAN LIBRARY SCIENCE S.R RANGANATHAN
INDIAS FIRST WOMAN PRIME MINISTER INDIRA GANDHI
AUTHOR OF “THE DIARY OF A YOUNG GIRL” ANNE FRANK
VASCODA GAMA PORTUGUESE NAVIGATOR
STEPHEN HAWKING BRITISH ASTROPHYSICIST
AUTHOR OF THE FAMOUS LINE ” SARE JAHAN SE ACHA” MUHAMMAD IQBAL
FIRST INDIAN TO DRIVE A FORMULA ONE CAR NARAIN KARTHIKEYAN
THE GOLDEN GIRL OF INDIA P.T USHA
AKIRA KUROSAWA JAPAN FILM MAKER
PRIME SUSPECT IN THE DESTRUCTION OF WTC OSAMA BIN LADEN
INDIAN HOCKEY COACH JOKIM KARVALO
DIRECTOR OF THE FILM “JURASSIC PARK” STEVEN SPIELBERG
FIRST ASIAN UN SECRETARY GENERAL U THANT
FIRST INDIAN WOMAN BADMINTON GRAND PRIX CHAMPION SANIA NEHWAL
FIRST INDIAN TO WIN BOOKER PRIZE ARUNDHATI ROY
FIRST TEST TUBE BABY IN THE WORLD LOUISE BROWN
FIRST INDIAN TEST TUBE BABY HARSHA
FIRST US PRESIDENT TO RESIGN FROM OFFICE RICHARD NIXSON
FIRST BLACK UN SECRETARY GENERAL KOFI ANNAN
FIRST INDIAN CRICKETER WHO SCORED TRIPLE CENTURY VIRENDER SEHWAG
FIRST INDIAN CRICKET CAPTAIN C.K NAYUDU
FIRST INDIAN HAT-TRICK IN TEST CRICKET HARBHAJAN SINGH
FIRST WOMAN SPACE TOURIST ANOUSHEH ANSARI
UN SCRETARY GENERAL (2007 -2012) BAN KI MOON
“IRON MAN OF INDIA” IS SARDAR VALLABABHAI PATEL
NOBEL PRIZE FOR PEACE 2006 MUHAMMAD YUNUS
NOBEL PRIZE FOR LITERATURE 2006 ORHAN PAMUK
BOOKER PRIZE 2006 WINNER KIRAN DESAI
KHEL RATNA AWARD 2006 PANKAJ ADVANI
WTA BEST NEWCOMER AWARD SANIA MIRZA
WORLD CHESS CHAMPION VLADIMIR KRAMNIK
INDIAS UN SECRETARY GENERAL CANDIDATE SASI TAROOR
YOUNGEST PADMA SHRI SANIA MIRZA
AFRICAS FIRST ELECTED WOMAN PRESIDENT ELLEN JOHNSON SIRLEAF
THE ZABTI SYSTEM WAS CONCEIVED BY AKBAR
MINISTER OF DEFENCE IN INDIA A.K ANTONY
CBI DIRECTOR VIJAY SHANKAR
INDIAS PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE TO THE UN NIRUPAM SEN
NAZI PARTY ADOLF HITLER
FIRST PERSON TO WIN THE NOBEL PRIZE FOR PEACE FREDERIC PASSY
CIRCULATION OF BLOOD WILLIAM HARVEY
” INDIAN SHAKESPEARE “ KALIDASA
“INDIAN NEPOLIAN “ SAMUDRA GUPTA
” MYSORE TIGER “ TIPPU SULTHAN
” FRONTIER GANDHI” KHAN ABDULGAFAR KHAN
WHO WAS KNOWN AS KERALA “SCOT” C.V Raman Pillai
WHOSE PEN NAME WAS “BOOS” Charles Dickens
WHO WAS THE ONLY WOMAN CEC IN INDIA V.S RAMA DEVI
WHO BROUGHT OUT NEWSPAPER “AL HILAL” MAULANA ABUL KALAM AZAD
LAST MUGHAL EMPEROR OF DELHI BAHADUR SHAH ZAFAR
WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING WAS ANNE HATHAWAY The wife of William Shakespeare
TO WHOM WAS THE FIRST PATENT FOR A TECHNICAL INVENTION AWARDED Filippo Brunelleschi
NATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION CHAIRMAN JUSTICE RAJENDRA BABU
WHO GOT SWATHI PURASKAR 2005 UMAYAL PURAM K. SIVARAMAN
AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY VICE CHANCELLOR K.K VISHAMBHARAN
THAKAZHI AWARD FOR SHORT STORIES RAMESH BABU
CHIEF OF INDIAN AIR FORCE FALI HOMI MAJOR
FIRST CHIEF MINISTER IN KERALA EMS NAMBOOTHIRIPAD
“CROCODILE HUNTER” STEVE IRWIN
SIR GEORGE CAYLEY IS KNOWN AS THE FATHER OF AVIATION
FIRST FOREIGNER , WHO GOT BHARAT RATNA GHAN ABDUL GAFARGHAN
FRENCH OPEN 2007 WOMENS TITLE WINNER JUSIN HENIN
“MUNNAR EVICTION” SPECIAL OFFICER SURESH KUMAR
SUNITHA L.WILLIAMS IS ASSOCIATED WITH SPACE SCIENCE
MISSILE MAN OF INDIA APJ ABDUL KALAM
GREEN REVOLUTION IN INDIA DR. SWAMINATHAN
FIRST WOMAN SPACE TOURIST ANOUSHEH ANSARI
FIRST BLACK TO RECEIVE THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE RALPH BUNCHE
FIRST HUMAN TO WALK IN SPACE ALEXEI LEONOV
DIRECTOR OF THE FILM ” GANDHI” RICHARD ATTEN BOROUGH
WHO COMPLETED 15000 RUNS IN ODI RECENTLY SACHIN TENDULKAR
WHO COINED THE WORD ” ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE “ JOHN MACKARTHI
ISRAEL S PRESIDENT SHIMON PERES
BRITISH PRIME MINISTER GORDON BROWN
WORLD BANK PRESIDENT ROBERT ZOELLICK
INFOSYS CEO S.GOPALAKRISHNAN
LONGEST UNINTERRUPTED STAY BY A WOMAN IN SPACE SUNITHA WILLIAMS
THE TITLE “SARDAR” TO VALLABHABHAI PATEL BY MOTILAL NEHRU

Filed under: General Knowledge, Who's Who, , ,

UPSC to conduct Indian Forest Service Exam on July 10

UPSC to conduct Indian Forest Service Exam on July 10

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New Delhi: The Union Public Service Commission’s (UPSC) Indian Forest Service Examination, 2010 will commence from July 10. The examination will be held at various centers across the country.

“Candidates must apply in the Common Application Form devised by the UPSC for its examinations, which can be purchased from the designated head post offices/ post offices (specified in Appendix-III of the notice) throughout the country,” said an official from the Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances & Pensions.

For details regarding the eligibility conditions, syllabus and scheme of the examination, centers of examination, guidelines for filling up application form etc. aspirants must consult the detailed notice of the examination published in the Employment News/ Rozgar Samachar dated February 20, 2010. Details are also available on the UPSC website.

“In case of any difficulty in obtaining application forms from the designated HPOs/POs, the candidates should contact the concerned post master or UPSC’s ‘Forms supply monitoring cell’ over telephone no.011-23389366/ Fax No.011-23387310,” he added.

Application must reach the ‘Secreary, Union Service Public Commission, Dholpur House, Shahjahan Road, New Delhi, 110069’ either by hand or by post/ speed post or by courier, on or before March 22, 2010.

However, in respect of candidates residing abroad or in certain remote areas specified in the notice, the last date for receipt of applications by post/speed post only (not by hand or by courier) is March 29, 2010.

Filed under: Forthcomming Exam,

UPSC announces Indian Forest Service Exam, 2009 result

UPSC announces Indian Forest Service Exam, 2009 result

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New Delhi: The Union Service Public Commission (UPSC) has announced the result of the Indian Forest Service Examination held in July 2009. The list in order of merit contains names of 84 candidates, including 33 belonging to Other Backward Classes (OBCs), 12 to the Scheduled Castes (SCs) and 07 to the Scheduled Tribes (STs).

“The government according to the number of vacancies available will make the appointment to the service. The number of vacancies intimated by the government is eighty-five. Result of one candidate has been withheld. The candidature of twenty-one candidates with Roll No. 00804, 02170, 02988, 04149, 06435, 06579, 07378, 07560, 08166, 08693, 10412, 11367, 12738, 12751, 12807, 13847, 14885, 17664, 27879, 32788 & 33298 is provisional,” said an official from the UPSC.

Candidates can obtain any information / clarification at UPSC facilitation counter during working hours in person or over telephone Nos.23385271 /23381125/23098543.

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UPSC announces Indian Forest Service Exam, 2009 result

Filed under: Forthcomming Exam, ,

NCERT committee brings forth recommendations to implement RTE

NCERT committee brings forth recommendations to implement RTE

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New Delhi: If the proposal of a National Council for Education Research and Training (NCERT) appointed committee comes into play then you will soon find road marshals drawn from National Cadet Cops (NCC) and National Service Scheme (NSS) on roads holding hands of your tiny tots helping them to cross the roads to and from the schools.

This is not all; they would also be responsible for arranging birth certificates for all children in schools and an incentive for children who identify school drop-outs.

The committee recommends developing a framework to implement the Right To Education (RTE) Act in Delhi so as to oversee its functioning.

Asking to waive off stamp duty on affidavits related to the date of birth of the child during school admissions to the Delhi government is another such recommendation. Upon which the Delhi government adds that thecommittee should themselves authorize the school authorities to attest the affidavit.

Talking about managing school education, the committee said that as of now, various bodies like Municipal Corporation of Delhi (MCD), New Delhi Municipal Corporation (NDMC) and Delhi government manage it, which should be now unified under one banner.

The committee head, Mr. Ashok Aggarwal, a lawyer-activist, said that, the proposed body should consider overhauling all proposed academic changes like textbooks, pattern of evaluation, medium of instruction and it should be even taken into consideration for any decision taken to shut down a school.

It has also kept in mind the most disputed matter of recent times – teacher’s salaries. The Human Resource Development (HRD) minister, Kapil Sibal may have although denied any interference of government in the matter related to teacher’s salaries at par with their government counterparts, but thecommittee has recommended protection of state salaries for teachers in private schools recognised under the RTE Act.

However, it is only in exceptional cases that grant-in-aid to pay their salaries could be considered, said the committee.

In order to check the school drop out rate among children, it proposes to provide incentives of about Rs.50 to children who help in identifying those who are not attending or enrolled in the school for some reasons.

Ensuring safety and security, especially of girl students, it proposes to establish police beats with women police constables at schools.

All state and state recognised schools in Delhi should have a unified website where they can declare results of children along with remarks and reports of their progress in the Continuous and Comprehensive Evaluation (CCE) system.

Bringing forth the wings of change in the recruitment process as well, the committee intends to rule out the conventional appointment of the head of schools by seniority alone.

It recommends that 75% of school principals should be selected through direct recruitment and only 25% through limited departmental examination.

Filed under: Educational News, NCERT, ,

National Science Day celebrated with fervor in the capital

National Science Day celebrated with fervor in the capital
New Delhi: Prithviraj Chavan, Minister of state for Science & Technology and Earth Sciences felicitated the award winners at a function organized in connection with National Science Day in Technology Bhawan here yesterday.Along with each award, a memento and a citation was presented.

Earlier the National Council for Science & Technology Communication (NCSTC), department of Science and Technology, govt. of India announced its annual national awards for Science & Technology communication for the year 2009 to recognize the outstanding work done in past five years by individual science communicators.

National award of Rs.1,00,000 for outstanding efforts in Science & Technology communication through books and magazines has been given to Dr. D.D. Ozha, Jodhpur (Rajasthan) for writing 23 books on energy, nanotechnology, water, Mars, Science and Vedas, environment, Moon, Sun, Earth, oceans, insects, biotechnology, soil etc, besides several popular science articles.

A similar award has been conferred upon N. Ramadurai, Chennai (Tamil Nadu) for his outstanding contribution as an author of popular science books in Tamil, namely Seyarkaikol (Satellites), Bhoomi (Earth), Kedal (Oceans), Sevvai (Mars) and Suriyan (Sun), besides a series of articles on ‘Anu Sakthi’ and a daily column ‘Theriyumman’ in popular newspapers.

National award of Rs.1,00,000 for outstanding effort in popularization of Science among children has been given to Takhellambam Robindro Singh, Thoubal (Manipur) for his contributions as guide teacher in National Children’s Science Congress and mentoring students for making science models.

The same award for exceptional effort in Science and Technology Communication in print medium has been given to Dinesh Chandra Sharma, Rampur (Uttar Pradesh) for his popular science columns on the occasions of year of Scientific Awareness-2004 and Understanding Planet Earth-2009 including contributions in well known science magazines and newspapers.

National award of Rs.1,00,000 in Science and Technology Communication in electronic medium has been given to Dr. Manas Pratim Das, 24 Paraganas (West Bengal) for his outstanding contribution as an anchor and quizmaster, hosting talk shows on FM radio, making a series of radio plays and a documentary besides producing popular programmes like Lanthan Theke Laser and Mahakashe Bharat in Bengali.

The Kalinga Chair for the year 2009 was awarded to Prof. Yash Pal, Chancellor, Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), New Delhi and Prof. Trinh X. Thuan, Department of Astronomy, USA on this occasion for their invaluable contributions in communicating science to people, who have jointly won the International UNESCO Kalinga Prizefor Science Popularization for the year 2009.

Government of India recognizes the efforts by conferring the Kalinga Chair on the UNESCO Kalinga prize winners, who are invited to deliver lectures on science communication to various target groups for a period of two to four weeks as a guest of the government of India. The chair comprises of a token amount of US $5000.

Dr. T. Ramasami, Secretary, Dept. of Science & Technology, govt. of India presided over the function.

Dr. Kamal Kant Dwivedi, Adviser & Head, NCSTC told that various science communication activities, such as science exhibitions, quiz competitions and science activity camps are being organized in various parts of the country to mark the National Science Day and spreading scientific awareness at grass root level.

The focal theme for this year’s National Science Day is ‘Gender Equity for Prosperity with Peace.’

National Science Day

In an effort to popularise the benefits of scientific knowledge and pratical appropriation, 28th February is celebrated as National Science Day (NSD). Under the initiative of Rashtriya Vigyan Evam Prodoyogiki Sanchar Parishad (RVPSP) (National Council for Science & Technology Communication)of the Ministry of Science and Technology various programmes ranging from a day to a full month either beginning or culminating on February 28 are implemented. The activities include debates, quiz competitions, exhibitions, lectures, etc., involving college and school students and teachers. All programmes and activities revolve round a theme selected for focus every year. The theme for the 21st National Science Day 2007 is “More Crop Per Drop”.

Significance

The Day is observed to mark the novel discovery of Raman Effect by the great Indian Physicist Sir C. V. Raman on 28th February, 1928. Raman Effect is a phenomenon in spectroscopy discovered by the eminent physicist while working in the laboratory of the Indian Association for the Cultivation of science, Kolkata. After two years of this discovery, Sir C. V. Raman brought the first Nobel Award for the country in 1930. Hence the National Science Day is a great day for Indian Science and scientific community.

Besides, National Science Day offers an opportunity to bring issues of science on to centre stage. The activities organized on the occasion provide public with an occasion to personally attend various programmes and be aware of the emerging issues of immediate concern. Organizing activities with the involvement of large number of people results into purposeful interaction between the science fraternity and the common people for mutual benefit.

Basic objectives:

The basic objective of observation of National Science Day is to spread the message of importance of science and its application among the people. This is essential to accelerate the pace of development. Even in the 21st century and despite many significant achievements certain sections of our society are still guided by blind faith and beliefs, which is reflected in the quality of decision making on developmental issues.

Observation of NSD attempts at generating scientific minded citizens. Science has contributed a great deal to human welfare. Through the gospel of reason and experimental observation, by which it works, it has enabled man to acquire intellectual and mental excellence. From the materialistic point of view, ranging from environmental issues, disease eradication, space exploration, energy production, information highway to name a few, science and technology has broken barriers to bring peace and prosperity with a cleaner environment with sustainable use of resource for the benefit of mankind. Biotechnology is making a major impact on agriculture, health, environment, industry and pharmaceuticals. Communication at lower costs, with greater accessibility, is another product of technology.

It helps inculcate scientific temper among school children. Health and hygiene issues are prime concerns for the common people. The daily application of science like the use of clean drinking water, knowledge to eradicate contagious disease, the know how of various agricultural practices to increase crop production, the usefulness of biodiversity conservation, etc., should be disseminated to the future generation.

Building of science communicators is another component of the NSD celebrations.

Modus operation:

All the NSD activities are planned around a theme suggested by RVPSP. Some of the recent themes are as follows:

2000: Recreating Interest in Basic Science

2001: Information Technology for Science Education

2002: Wealth from Waste

2003: 50 years of DNA & 25 years of IVF – The blue print of Life

2004: Encouraging Scientific Awareness in Community

2005: Celebrating Physics

2006: Nurture Nature for our future

2007: More Crop Per Drop

The Theme’s focus is on efforts to build a eco-water-literate society that values water. It advocates the Optimum use of water in all aspects of human activity and water conservation by all means. It is expected to make common man understand and appreciate the value and importance of water. The awareness thus created will encourage judicious and optimum use of the liquid cautioning the dangers ahead arising out of diminishing water level and paucity of the life sustaining resource.

Source : Press Information Bureau

Filed under: Important Days, ,

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