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Little kitten Powerpoint Presentation

Prepared by

Deepa Upadhyay

PRT

KV Baramulla

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Filed under: Creative Corner-Staffs,

Types of Soil in India-Alluvial Soil and Black Soil


Types of Soil in India


The main categories of soils in India are: (i) Alluvial soils (ii) Black soils (iii) Red soils (iv) Laterite soils (v) Mountain and hill soils (vi) Terai soils (vii) Desert (or Arid) soil and (viii) Peat soils.

Alluvial soil and Black soil
Alluvial soil is that soil which is formed by deposition of silts brought down by the rivers. It is rich in hydrated oxides of iron and is very fertile. Black soil or the black cotton soil has a good water-holding capacity and is best suited for deep-rooted crops like cotton. The black soil in wet condition is compact and sticky.

The most extensive soil cover of India comprises alluvial soils.

Soil Erosion: The soils are usually six to twelve inches in depth. In course of time, the fertility level of the soil is depleted with the result that the soil no longer remains suitable for agriculture. Soil conservation is, therefore, necessary for continued agricultural

prosperity.

The agencies of erosion are winds, water and waves of which the water erosion is most common. Rain water removes soil from the surface of sloping lands. Winds remove top soil of lands.

Laterite soils are formed by the weathering of laterite rocks. These can be distinguished from other soils by their acidity. Laterite soils are generally poor on the higher levels and cannot retain moisture. In the plains, however, they consist of heavy loams and clay and can retain moisture.

Laterite soils occur in Madhya Pradesh, Assam and along the Eastern and Western Ghats. Tea plantation requires acidity which is there in the laterite soil. It is, therefore, common in these areas.

Filed under: General Knowledge, Geography: general Knowledge, , , , , , , , , ,

Monsoons in India




Monsoons are periodic winds which blow from sea to land for six months in summer and from land to sea for six months in winter. Monsoon winds prevail over India at different seasons.

South-West Monsoons: These are rain-bearing winds which prevail from about the end of May to the end of September. During summer, the sun’s rays fall vertically on the Tropic of Cancer making the Indian plains intensely hot. But the rays of the sun fall obliquely over the Indian Ocean during this period. The land is hotter than the sea, there is, therefore, low pressure over the land and high pressure over the sea. The winds blow from high to low pressure i.e., from the sea to the land, and are therefore wet winds. Because of the rotation of the earth, the monsoon winds blowing over India deflect to the right after crossing the Equator and become south-west winds. These are, therefore, called south-west monsoons.
India depends largely on these rain-bearing south-west winds. These winds give to India about 90% of the total rainfall. During their prevalence, the chief crops cultivated are rice, cotton, tobacco, tea, jawar and bajra.

North-East Monsoons (or Winter Monsoons): During the months of November to January i.e., in winter, the sun’s rays fall vertically on the Tropic of Capricorn. The air over the Indian Ocean during this period thus becomes hot and light and there is low pressure. The sun’s rays fall obliquely on the plains of India during these months with the result that the air over these plains is cold and heavy and there is high pressure. The winds, therefore, blow from plains to the Indian Ocean. While crossing the Equator, they deflect to the left and are known as north-east monsoons.

The North-East Monsoons bring only about 10% of the total rain to India as they are chilly and dry land winds. But the moisture that they pick from the Bay of Bengal, little as it is, is very useful. Wheat, barley, oats, oilseeds and sugarcane are cultivated during this season.

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Current Affairs

DS
National Technology Award, 2010
A pioneer in processing rice bran oil, A.R. Sharma, who comes from dusty town of Dhuri in Sangrur district, has been honoured with the national award by the Technology Development Board of the Ministry of Science and Technology.

Dan David Prize
Noted Indian author Amitav Ghosh has won the prestigious Dan David Prize for his remarkable reworking of the great tradition of the western novel in transnational terms.

PM’s Award for Excellence in Public Administration
Gulshan Bamra has been given the award for his initiative to involve community in the Naxal-affected areas of Madhya Pradesh.

First Indian to sail solo around the world
On May 22, 2010, Commander Dilip Donde of the Indian Navy became the first Indian ever to circumnavigate the globe solo on a sail-boat when he steered into the Mumbai harbour after his arduous effort spanning a little over nine months.

PERSONS
Kapadia, Justice Sarosh Homi

He has been appointed as the 38th Chief Justice of India. Hailing from a poor family, Justice Kapadia replaced Justice Balakrishnan.

Singh, Gen V.K.
Gen V.K. Singh is the Chief of Indian army
. A third generation officer from the Rajput regiment, Gen Singh is a graduate of the Wellington-based Defence Services Staff College as well as the Rangers Course at Fort Benning, USA and the US Army War College, Carlisle.

Commonwealth Prize, 2010
British-Indian author Rana Dasgupta (38) has won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for ‘Best Book’ on for his second book Solo. Rana won a prize of  £10,000 (Rs 8.5 lakh).

INS Shivalik—India’s first indigenous stealth warship
On April 29, 2010, India affected a generational shift in its warship-building capability by commissioning INS Shivalik—the first indigenously built stealth frigate that is the biggest in its class in the world. The ship, which is 143 metres long, can tactically fire weapons even before the enemy detects it.

SPACE RESARCH
IKAROS—First solar powered spacecraft
Japanese scientists have developed a kite-shaped ‘space yacht’ that uses only solar power for propulsion. The spacecraft—IKAROS—would be launched into the space for a six-month mission to Venus. It is the first spacecraft to use such technology.

Census 2010
The 15th national census exercise, the biggest census ever to be attempted in human history to cover India’s 1.2 billion population, began on April 1, 2010 with President Pratibha Patil being the first to be enumerated in the decennial exercise.

National Population Register
The NPR would be a register of usual residents of the country. The NPR will be a comprehensive identity database that would help in better targeting of the benefits and services under the government schemes/programmes, improve planning and help strengthen security of the country. This is being done for the first time in the country.

Unique Identification (UID) number christened Aadhaar
Aadhaar, or the 12-digit unique identification (UID) number that will identify the 1.2 billion residents of India on the basis of their biometrics, will have an additional four digits that will be hidden from the common man.

World’s smallest 3-D map
Scientists claim to have created the world’s smallest three dimensional map—a map of the Earth so small that 1,000 of them could fit on one grain of salt.

A team at computer giant IBM accomplished this through a new, breakthrough technique which uses a tiny, silicon tip with a sharp apex—1,00,000 times smaller than a sharpened pencil—to create patterns and structures as small as 15 nanometre at greatly reduced cost and complexity.

Official Song Selected for World Cup Football 2010 ( South Africa )?

World renowned Latin American pop singer, Shakira will perform the official
song of 2010 Football World Cup accompanied with the South African band
Freshlyground. Waka Waka is the official song, selected by FIFA and Sony.

Vivek Sahai takes over as chairman of Railway Board

  • Sahai, an Indian Railway Traffic Service officer, who was the Railway Board (member) traffic, has taken up the top job from S S Khurana upon his superannuation.

Filed under: Current Affairs:-Events / Happenings / Observances/Appointments:,

World’s Largest Producers of Crops, Minerals, Industrial goods etc.


Aluminium: U.S.A., Canada Norway, Switzerland

, France and India.
Asbestos: Canada leads in the world in production of Asbestos.
Carpets: Iran, India.
Cheese: U.S.A., England, Netherlands and Australia.
Coal: U.S.A., England, Germany, Russia, Australia and India.
Cocoa: Ghana, S. America and West Indies.
Coffee: Brazil, Indonesia, India.
Copper: Chile.
Cotton: U.S.A., Russia, Egypt, India, Brazil, Argentina and Pakistan.
Electric Bulbs: England, U.S.A., India.
Gold: South Africa, Australia, Canada, S. America, India.
Ilmenite: India.
Iron ore: U.S.A., CIS, U.K., France, Germany, India and Spain.
Jute: Bangladesh, India.
Manganese: India is largest producer of Manganese in the world. Gabon Republic situated on the western coast of South Africa is known as having one of the richest deposits at Moanda.
Mercury: Italy, Spain and U.S.A.
Monazite: India, supplies 88% of the world’s need.
Petroleum: U.S.A., Venezuela, Russia, Middle East countries, Iran and Myanmar.
Plastic Goods: U.S.A., England.
Rock Phosphate: Morocco is world’s leading supplier.
Rubber: Malaysia, Indonesia and Sri Lanka. About 40% of the world’s natural rubber is produced by Malaysia.
Silk: China, U.S.A., France.
Silver: Mexico, U.S.A., Peru and India.
Steel: U.S.A., Germany, CIS and England.
Sugar: Cuba.
Tea: India, China, Sri Lanka, Japan and Indonesia.
Tin: Malaysia, Indonesia.
Wool: Australia, Argentina, New Zealand and South Africa.

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Saina Nehwal wins the Indonesian Open 2010

India’s Saina Nehwal made her country proud on Sunday as she won the Indonesian Open Super Series for her third straight badminton title in three weeks, including two successive Super Series titles. The World No.3 defeated a fighting Sayaka Sato of Japan 21-19, 13-21, 21-11 in the final here on Sunday, a win that is expected to take her to No.2 in the World rankings.

Filed under: General Knowledge, Sports,

Chief Crops and Producing States in India


Bajra (millets): Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu, Punjab, Andhra Pradesh and Rajasthan.
Barley: U.P., Bihar, Haryana. Its cultivation requires cool climate.
Cardamom: Karnataka. India is the largest producer of cardamom in the world.
Cashewnut: Kerala.
Cinchona: Tamil Nadu (Nilgiri Hills); West Bengal (Darjeeling).
Coconut: Kerala is the leading producer of coconut in India. A coconut tree normally yield 60-70 nuts in a year.
Coffee: Karnataka, Tamil Nadu (Nilgiri Hills) and Kerala. It is a tropical shrub.
Cotton: Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Punjab and Maharashtra.
Cotton Seeds: Maharashtra, Punjab, Madhya Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu.
Gram and Pulses: U.P., Madhya Pradesh, Haryana, Punjab, Maharashtra and Karnataka.
Groundnut: Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh and Andhra Pradesh.
Hemp: Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh and U.P.
Jute: Assam, West Bengal, Bihar and Orissa.
Linseed: Madhya Pradesh, Bihar, Orissa, U.P.,  Maharashtra and West Bengal.
Maize: U.P., Bihar and the Punjab.
Mustard and Rape-seed (Sarson): U.P., West Bengal, Punjab, Bihar and Orissa.
Poppy (opium plant): U.P., Madhya Pradesh, Punjab, Himachal Pradesh, Jammu and Kashmir.
Rice: Andhra Pradesh, West Bengal, Madhya Pradesh, Bihar, Tamil Nadu and Orissa. Rice is sown on the largest acreage in India.
Rubber: Kerala, Tamil Nadu, Karnataka.
Saffron: Jammu and Kashmir. It is obtained from the stigma of the saffron plant.
Silk: Karnataka, Jammu & Kashmir, West Bengal and Assam.
Spices: Pepper in Kerala and West Bengal; Chillies in West Bengal, Tamil Nadu and Maharashtra; Cardamom in Karnataka and Tamil Nadu; Betelnuts in West Bengal and South India.
Sugarcane: U.P., Bihar, West Bengal, Punjab and Maharashtra.
Tea: Assam, West Bengal, Kerala and Tamil Nadu (Nilgiri Hills), Uttarkhand (Dehradun)  and Himachal Pradesh (Kangra Hills).
Tobacco: Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, U.P., West Bengal, Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu and Karnataka.
Wheat: U.P., Punjab, Haryana and Madhya Pradesh. To some extent in Bihar, Rajasthan and Maharashtra. It is sown in October-November and reaped in April.

Kharif and Rabi Crops
Kharif Crops: are crops raised in autumn as a result of sowing done in June-July. These are cotton, rice, maize and millets.
Rabi Crops: are winter crops sown in October and November and reaped in April. These are wheat, gram, linseed and mustard.

Filed under: General Knowledge, Geography: general Knowledge, , , , ,

Abbrevations Starting With C


CA: Chartered Accountant
CABE: Central Advisory Board of Education
C & AG: Comptroller & Auditor General
CAIR: Centre for Artificial Intelligence and Robotics
CAPART: Council for People’s Action and Advancement of Rural Technology
CAPES: Computer-Aided Paperless Examination System
CAS: Chief of Army Staff; Chief of Air Staff; Conditional Access System
CB: Citizen Band (Radio)
CBI: Central Bureau of Investigation
CBFC: Central Board of Film Certification
CCPA: Cabinet Committee on Political Affairs
CD: Conference on Disarmament
C-DAC: The Centre for Development of Advanced Computing
CDMA: Code Division Multiple Access
CECA: Comprehensive Economic Cooperation Agreement
CERN: European Organisation for Nuclear Research (Pronounced CERN in French)
CFC: Chlorofluro Carbon
CFS: Container Freight Station
CHOGM: Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting
CIA: Central Intelligence Agency (of U.S.A.)
CIBIL: Credit Information Bureau (India) Ltd
CIC: Chief Information Commissioner
CID: Criminal Investigation Department
C-in-C: Commander-in-Chief
cif: cost, insurance and freight
CIS: Commonwealth of Independent States
CISF: Central Industrial Security Force
CITES: Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species
CITU: Centre of Indian Trade Unions
CLASS: Computer Literacy and Studies in Schools
CLAWS: Centre for Land Warfare Studies
CM: Command Module; Chief Minister
CMP: Common Minimum Programme
CNG: Compressed Natural Gas
CNN: Cable News Network
CNS: Chief of the Naval Staff
CO: Commanding Officer
COD: Central Ordnance Depot; Cash on Delivery
CPCB: Central Pollution Control Board
CPI: Communist Party of India
CPI(M): Communist Party of India (Marxists)
CPU: Central Processing Unit
CR: Central Railway
CRAC: Cyber Regulation Advisory Council
CRDi: Common Rail Direct injection
CRISIL: Credit Rating Information Services of India Limited
CRM: Customer Relationship Management
CRR: Cash Reserve Ratio
CRPF: Central Reserve Police Force
CSIR: Council of Scientific and Industrial Research
CTBT: Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty
CTT: Commodities Transaction Tax
CVRDE: Combat Vehicles Research and Development Establishment

Filed under: Abbreviations To Know,

Major SCIENTIFIC LAWS

Archimedes’ Principle: It states that a body, when immersed in a liquid, experiences an upward thrust equal to the weight of the liquid displaced by it.

Avogadro’s Hypothesis: It is a modification of Berzelius’ hypothesis. It states that equal volumes of all gases under similar conditions of temperature and pressure contain equal number of molecules. Avogadro’s law is applicable only to gases.

Boyle’s Law: states that the volume of certain gas is inversely proportional to the pressure at a constant temperature. In other words the product of pressure  and volume remains constant provided the temperature is kept constant i.e., P x V = a constant if T remains the same.

Charles’s Law: It states that at constant pressure all gases expand by 1/273 of their volume at 0°C for a rise in temperature of 1°C  i.e., the volume of a given mass of gas at constant pressure is directly proportional to the absolute temperature.

Dulong and Petit’s Law: states that the product of atomic weight and specific heat of solid elements is nearly equal to 6.4 i.e., At wt. x sp. heat = 6.4 approx.

Gay-Lussac’s Law of combining volumes: Gases react together in volumes which bear simple whole number ratios to one another and also to the volumes of the products, if gaseous—all the volumes being measured under similar conditions of temperature and pressure.

Graham’s Law of Diffusion: states that the rates of diffusion of gases are inversely proportional to the square roots of their densities under similar conditions of temperature and pressure.

Kepler’s Law: According to this law, a line drawn from the sun to a planet, moving around it, sweeps over a fixed area in a given interval of time.

Law of definite proportions: A chemical compound is always found to be made up of the same elements combined together in the same ratio by weight.

Law of Floatation: for a body to float, the following conditions must be fulfilled: (1) The weight of the body should be equal to the weight of the water displaced. (2) The centre of gravity

of the body and that of the liquid displaced should be in the same straight line.

Lenz’s Law: When there is change in the magnetic flux linked with a circuit, the electric current induced in the circuit will have a magnetic field opposing the change producing it.

Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation: states that “Every portion of matter attracts or tends to approach every other portion of matter in the universe with a force proportional to the masses and inversely as the square of the distance.”

Newton’s First Law of Motion: “A body continues in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line unless compelled by an external force to change that state.”

Newton’s Second Law of Motion: “The rate of change of momentum is proportional to the impressed force and takes place in the direction of the force.”

Newton’s Third Law of Motion: “To every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.”
Newton’s Law of Cooling: states that the rate of loss of heat of a hot body is directly proportional to the difference of temperature between the body and the surroundings and is independent of the nature of the body.

Ohm’s Law: states that the ratio of the potential difference between the ends of a conductor and the current flowing in the conductor is constant, e.g., for a potential difference of E volts and a current I amperes, the resistance R,  in ohms is equal to E/I.

Principle of conservation of energy: It states that, in any system, energy cannot be created or destroyed; the sum of mass and energy remains constant.

Snell’s Law: It states that the ratio of the sine of angle of incidence to the sine of the angle of refraction remains constant for any two given media.

Specific heat of substance: The quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 gram.  of a substance through 1°C.

Filed under: General Knowledge, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

ABBREVIATIONS Starting with B


ABBREVIATIONS Starting with B

B
BARC: Bhabha Atomic Research Centre
BBC: British Broadcasting Corporation
BC: Before Christ; Board of Control; British Columbia; Battery Commander
BCG: Bacillus Calmette Guerin—Anti-Tuberculosis Vaccine
BICP: Bureau of Industrial Costs and Prices
BIFR: Board of Industrial and Financial Reconstruction
BIOS: Basic Input Output System
BKU: Bharatiya Kisan Union
BMD: Ballistic Missile Defence System
BOLT: BSE On-Line Trading (System)
BOSS: Bharat Operating System Solutions
BPO: Business Process Outsourcing
BPR: Bottom Pressure Records
BRO: Border Road Organisation
BSE: Bombay Stock Exchange
BSF: Border Security Force
BSNL: Bharat Sanchar Nigam Ltd

Filed under: Abbreviations To Know, ,

A Dream is a sequence of images

DREAMS

A Dream is a sequence of images, predominantly visual in character, which are experienced during sleep. A dream has commonly one or more scenes, several characters in addition to the dreamer, and a sequence of action &interaction usually involving the dreamer. It is like a motion picture or a dramatic production in which the dreamer is both a participant and an observer. The images of a dream are projections of mind. A projection is a representation of what is in the mind. Dreams, are in fact, creative expressions of the human mind .They tell us what is going on in a mind of a person. The language of dreams consists of pictures which are concrete representations of the mind ideas. What kind of conceptions are expressed by dreams? There is the whole world of the personal , the intimate, the emotional & conflictful, and it is this world of ideas out of which dreams are formed. A dream is a personal document,  a letter to oneself. In the first place dreams reveal what we really think of our selves when the mask of waking life is removed. These self conceptions are important because what a person thinks about himself has a great influence upon how he behaves. If a person thinks he is a  failure, the chances are that he will try to live up to this image of himself and be a failure. If he thinks he has done some immoral act, his life will be full feelings of guilt, even if he tries to justify himself to others. Dreams also reveal how the dreamer conceives  of others people. During sleep it is not uncommon for impulses that are kept in check during waking life to express themselves in dreams. Many are unpleasant, even terrifying as in the case of night mares. The dreamer is being chased by a man with a knife, a lion about to spring on him, the house is on fire, he is drowning or he is arrested and put in a prison. These are all punishment dreams. The dreamer feeling guilty for a misdeed in finding himself punished. Everyone has problems and everyone tries to do something about them. The dreamer should be interpreted as a whole, because it reflects an interconnected network of ideas in the mind of the dreamer. By analyzing a dream sequence once arrives at a more comprehensive and more coherent view of the conceptual  system and the subconscious contents of a persons.

Thank you

Written by

Mehwish Irshad

Filed under: Creative Corner-Students,

Quiz , GK Questions with Answer


351.The period of the Tenth Five Year Plan Is

A.1995 -2000          B.2000-2005        C.2001-2006        D.2002-2003

352. Who founded the I.N.A.?

A. BalGangadharaTilak      B. Subhash Chandra Bose              C. Bhagat Singh

D.Chandra Sekhar Azad

353.  Hirakud Dam is built on the river:

A. Narmada B. Sutlej          C.Tapti        D. Mahanadi

354. During sleep:

A. Pulse rate is increased  B. blood pressure is reduced

C. blood pressure is increased                 D.None of the above

355. Beirut is the capital of

A. Lebanon                   B. Libya      C. Poland     D. Portugal

356. The disease bronchitis is associated with :A. lungs     B. liver                  C. kidney       D. heart

357. An atom whose nucleus is unstable undergoes change by throwing

dectromagnetic  energy  and:

A.electrical particles B. magnetism               C. light                        D.heat

358.Which practice was in existence during the  Rig Vedic period ?

A. Polyandry              B. Polygamy           C. Bigamy           D. Monogamy

359. The port city of the Indus Valley people was:

A. Mohenjo – daro     B.   Khalibangan   C. Lothal         D. Harappa

360.Vasco da Gama landed in India at:

A. Cochin            B. Madras        C. Bombay D. Calicut

361. Jute is grown on large scale in the delta

of:

A. Indus             B. Damodar                   C. Satlej               D. Ganger

362. Who among the following Delhi Sultans was criticised as a mixture of

opposites?

A. Firoz ShahTughlaq      B. Balban      C. Muhammad Bin Tughlak

D. Jalaluddin Khilji

363.Which one of the following is an. Artificial harbour ?

A. Cochin    B. Kandla         C.Madras    D.Calcutta

364. Kerala’s Share in the coconut production is ………….% in the country :

A.  41             B. 51                C. 61               D.31

365. Atomic power is obtained from:         .
A. Uranium               B. Platinum        C.Iron          D. Silver

366. Bombay was taken by the English East India Company   from :

A. Charles I       B.The Dutch            C. The Portuguese    D. Charles II

367. Which of the following Ls not presently obtained  from the sea in large amounts ?

A . Bromine     B. Gold      C.Salt         D.Magnesium

368. De Vries was a:
A.Italian botanist          B. Dutch botanist    C. English botanist   D.French botanist

369. Pedagogy is the science of:

A . human body B. glands        C. teaching           D.  insects

370. The longest Railwayline is :

A . Canadian-Pacific Railway          B. Indian Railway       C. London Railway

D. Trans-Siberian Railway

371. Cofee powder is processed from its

A.  Fruits           B.  Flowers        C. Leaves         D. Branches

372. The Capital of Cuba is:
A . Warsaw                B. Lagos        C. Havana        D. Addis Ababa

373. Pookkode lake is situated in ……….district of Kerala

A. Wayanad               B.Ernakulam              C. Thrissur       D. Kozhikkodu

374. The currency of Burma is:

A.   Kyat          B. Rupee          C.Leva          D.Taka

375. The renowned sea side resort in South Kerala

A. Ashtamudi             B. Vizhinjam               C. Kovalam                D. Kanyakumary

376. Silent Valley National park is situated in………..district

A. Palakkadu        B. Idukki         C. Wayanadu        D. Kasaragod

377. Which one of the following is the most effective means of

corrosion?

A. water      B. plants         C. air               D. carbon dioxide

378. A disease that may be inherited is :

A. trichinosis  B. pellagra     C. malaria   D. hemophilia

379. A substance that can be synthesised by green plants but not by animals is:

A. carbon dioxide      B.uric acid      C. protein D. cellulose

380. The World Environment Day is celebrated every year on

A. June 5                   B. April 4           C. September5      D. October 16

381.The famous Meenakshi temple is situated in:

A. Ujjain             B. Madurai              C. Mahabalipuram                D. Bhuvaneswar

382. The disease “Mumps” spreads towards:

A. skull    B. chin and neck            C. neck and under the jaw    D. arm – pi     t

383. How many players form a Water Polo team ?

A. 3                        B. 5                  C. 8                 D.6

384. Kaziranga sanctuary is famous for which of the following animals/birds ?

A.Tigers B. One horned Indian Rhinos         C. Wild Elephants     D. Ducks

385.The branch of science dealing with the better­ment of living conditions is called?

A.ethnology B. euthenies  C. eugenies     D. none of the above

386. A rocket going straight up with less than es­cape velocity will:

A. become a satellite of the earth               B. become a moon satellite

C.  never reach the earth                  D. fall back to the earth

387. All cereals belong to the family ?

A. Gramineae            B. Umbelliferae     C. Leguminosae   D. Cruciferae

388. Another element having a long-life which can be used for radioactive dating of

rocks is:

A. protactinium – 234    B. carbon -14    C. strontium-83 D. thorium-234

389. Water that is available to the plants and readily  absorbed is :

A. hydroscopic water  B. run – away water  C.rain water D. capillary water

390. Sweetness of sound depends upon :
A. periodicity and regularity B. velocity    C. frequency         D. amplitude

391. Which of the following is the richest source of carbohydrates ?

A. maize     B. wheat     C. barley     D.rice

392. Magnetic field is measured by:

A. arometer          B. fluxmeter               C. thermopile D. pyrometer

393. Who is the author of the book ” Mein Kamf’ ?

A.  Winston Churchill            B. Einstein     C. Adolf Hitler                 D. Mussolini

394. Sundarbans is a good example of:

A.Mangrove forests       B. Scrub forests            C. Evergreen forests

D. Monsoon forests

395. Which one of the following countries was the centre of activities of the I.N.A. ?

A. Burma        B. Tibet       C. Singapore D. Ceylon

396. The practice of ‘Sati’ was abolished by:

A. LordCornwallis B. Lord Dalhousie    C. Lord Curson          D. Lord William Bentinck

397. Annie Besant was a/an:
A. Spanish lady              B. Irish lady    C. British lady            D. French lady

398. Which one of the following disease is sex – linked ?

A.cancer     B. diabetes   C. colour blindness         D. night blindness

399. The condition which causes the eye -. ball to become slightly too long is known

as:

A.corneal ulcer     B. myopia      C. cornea       D. inflammation of the sclera

400. The Black Pagoda is in :

A. Arunachal Pradesh    B. Madhya Pradesh   C. Bihar D.Orissa

Answer

351. B.2000-2005

352. B. Subhash Chandra Bose

353. D. Mahanadi

354. B. blood pressure is reduced

355. A. Lebanon

356. A. lungs

357. A.electrical particles

358. D. Monogamy

359. D. Monogamy

360. D. Calicut

361. B. Damodar

362. C. Muhammad Bin

363. C.Madras

364. A.  41

365. A. Uranium

366. D. Charles II

368. B. Gold

368. A.Italian botanist

369. C. teaching

330. D. Trans-Siberian Railway

331. A.  Fruits

332. C. Havana

333. A. Wayanad

334. A.   Kyat

335. C. Kovalam

336. A. Palakkadu

337. A. water

338. D. hemophilia

339. D. cellulose

380. A. June 5

381. B. Madurai

382. C. neck and under the jaw

383. A. 3

384. B. One horned Indian Rhinos

385. B. euthenies

386. D. fall back to the earth

387. A. Gramineae

388. C. strontium-83

389. D. capillary water

390. A. periodicity and regularity

391. D.rice

392. B. fluxmeter

393. C. Adolf Hitler

394. A.Mangrove forests

395. C. Singapore

396. D. Lord William Bentinck

397. B. Irish lady

398. C. colour blindness

399. D. inflammation of the sclera

400. D.Orissa

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Abbrevations Starting With the Alphabet F

F
FAO: Food and Agriculture Organisation
FBI: Federal Bureau of Investigation (of the U.S.A.)
FCNR: Foreign Currency (non-resident) Accounts Scheme
FDR: Flight Data Recorder; Fixed Deposit Receipt
FEMA: Foreign Exchange Management Act
FERA: Foreign Exchange Regulations Act
FICCI: Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry
FII: Foreign Institutional Investors
FIPB: Foreign Investment Promotion Board (of India)
FLAG: Fibre Optic Link Around the Globe
FM: Field Marshal; Frequency Modulated
FPSB: Financial Planning Standards Boards (India)
FRBM: Fiscal Responsibility and Budget Management
FSSA: Food Safety and Standards Authority (of India)
FTA: Free Trade Area
FTP: File Transfer Protocol

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