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Chacha Nehru’s Life

Nehru’s life

Jawaharlal Nehru was born on 14th November, 1889 to Motilal Nehru and his wife Swaroop Rani. From the beginning he was an exceptional child and brilliant child. After the early education his father sent him foreign to pursue higher education.

Nehru completed his higher education in England at Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge University. He completed his M.A. from Cambridge University, England. After his returned to India, Nehru practiced law before joining into politics.

After quitting the legal profession, he joined the Congress and Gandhiji in the Freedom Struggle of India. He was an extremely outspoken, honest, practical and courageous politician. And when India gained its independence, he was unanimously selected by the Congress to lead the country as first Prime Minister of the independent India.

Children's Day
Pt. Nehru was not only a great leader, statesman but also a great philosopher and think-tact of all time. He perfectly blended the western scientific thinking with eastern philosophical values.

He was also a great poet and writer of his own. His famous works are ‘Glimpses of World History’ and ‘Discovery of India’.

His letters to his daughter, Indira Priyadarshini from the jail reflects his philosophical outlook, and his compassion to children.

He was fondly referred as Chacha Nehru by the children. He was also fond of both children and roses.

He started to wear a rose on his jacket after a child pinned one rose on his jacket. He often stated that children were like the flowers in a garden and they should be carefully nurtured. He said the children’s are the future and foundation of a nation. Every one should keep a careful eye for their development and upheaval.

For him children’s were little adults in the making. Nehru’s empathy toward children is well-known, he once said, “Our one goal, our bounden duty, is to gift the future of India – our children – a country filled with peace and tranquility.”

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Filed under: Important Days, ,

Children’s Day: Celebrate! The day is yours

Celebrate! The day is yours

 

Did you know every country has a Children’s Day? Though the dates may differ it is still a celebration —a day for kids to enjoy themselves, but also one to think of kids not as lucky as themselves.

 

 


“Children are the World’s most valuable resources and its best hope for the future” –

John F. Kennedy

The child must know that he is a miracle, that since the beginning of the world there hasn’t been, and until the end of the world there will not be, another child like him.”

Pablo Casals


 


 

Chacha Nehru’s return gift on his birthday was that the day be made a reason to celebrate children as they will take on the nation tomorrow. And this is why year after year we celebrate his birthday as Children’s Day. But what’s even more interesting is that each country has a day dedicated to celebrate the spirit of children and recognise their talent.

The International Children’s Day which initially began in Turkey in 1920 was later adopted by Geneva during the world conference held in 1925. No one really knows why June 1 was chosen as the International Children’s Day but the theories are many. One of them is that it coincided with the orphans in China celebrating the Dragon Boat Festival, and hence the day remained.

The Universal Children’s Day is on November 20. The U.N. asked all countries to introduce a day to promote childhood.

Across the world

 

The People’s Republic of China celebrates Children’s Day on June 1. The Government encourages children to take part in activities as a mark of loyalty.

In Japan, the National Children’s Day is known as Kodomo no Hi. It is celebrated on May 5. Families make Kashiwamochi (rice cakes filled with red beans and wrapped with oak leaves) and Chimaki (rice cakes wrapped with bamboo leaves). Families also hang Shobu (irises) since irises were believed to repel evil spirits.

Australians celebrate Children’s Day on the first Sunday of July. Annual cultural activities are held to provide funding to all the disadvantaged children throughout Australia through the sale of ‘Happy Children’s Day’ cards.

In Dubai, Children’s Day is mostly celebrated in schools, or by the Indian consulate in partnership with a school — like the Indian High School.

In Mexico, children go to school, to attend a fiesta held by the school and at the end of which they are given a gift. In the afternoon, a parade is held for the children. Floats are also part of the parade. At the end of the parade, prizes are awarded to the best float and best costume.

In Singapore, it’s October 1 and it’s a holiday for kids and every school celebrates it in a different way. There are celebrations like fairs, little treats for children and programmes for the family.

Before its unification, Germany, had two days on which Children’s Day would be celebrated. In East Germany, it was known as “International Children’s Day” and in West Germany, it was called “World Children’s Day”. However, in West Germany, Children’s Day was mostly unknown to many .

In Pakistan, Children’s Day is celebrated on November 20. There are special programmes dedicated for children that are aired on TV and radio and special assemblies that happen in school along with some cultural programmes.

Carnival time

 

 

Thailand celebrates the second Saturday in January as Children’s Day. Many organisations — both governmental and commercial have various activities lined up for kids. They can visit zoos and use the buses for free. According to tradition, Thailand’s Prime Minister also needs to give a unique motto for children every year on this day. Children get to go to the government house; they sit in the seats of the Prime Minister and also in the conference room of the parliament. The Military has a show of military equipment, vehicle and aircraft for them.

In Argentina, El Día del Niño (Children’s Day) is celebrated on the second Sunday of August. Children receive gifts from their parents, and the community puts together events just for them.

In the U.K., Children’s Day is celebrated on August 30. And, there is a carnival for two days in London, called the Notting Hill Carnival. All school-going children perform and the carnival is extended to the next day, where Caribbean, Thai, Nigerian and Chinese food stalls are set up and there is a small parade.

Days across the globe

 

Thailand : The second

Saturday in January .

Hong Kong : April 4

Mexico : April 30

Japan : Known as Kodomo no

Hi it is celebrated on May 5.

Indonesia : July 23

Argentina : Known as El Día del

Niño is celebrated on the

second Sunday of August.

Singapore : October 1

Brazil : October 12

Canada : November 20

Pakistan : November 20.

Central Africa : December 25

Filed under: Important Days, ,

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