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All CBSE schools to have health and wellness clubs

All CBSE schools to have health and wellness clubs

New Delhi: India is planning to set up a health and wellness club in all the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) schools across the country to promote safe sanitation practice, Human Resource Development Minister Kapil Sibal said on Tuesday.

“Health and wellness club will be set up in all schools for better sanitation. Let’s promise for zero tolerance against poor sanitation,” Sibal said after launching the National School Sanitation Initiative.

He said only nine percent of school students wash their hands before eating and these clubs will promote issues like these among students. “They are the future and their good health will help a build a better tomorrow.”

The initiative is a collaboration project between the Human Resource Development (HRD) ministry and the urban development ministry. It is estimated that 17 percent of the urban population in India currently has no access to any sanitation facilities, while 50-80 percent of the wastewater is disposed untreated.

Anshu Vaish, secretary school education, said at least 45 percent of Indian schools do not have separate toilets for girls. “This is impacting girl students’ admission and we have a long way to go in improving this situation.”

Initially the health and wellness club will come up in CBSE schools as it is the initiative of the board, Vaish told the sources.

“We will inform all the state boards and if they want all the materials can be translated to desired regional languages.”

S. Jaipal Reddy, who was also present at the event, said safe drinking water and sanitation are part of the millennium development goals and the government is striving to better the situation.

“With this initiative, we will create awareness about sanitation in school level. Students are change agents and we are targeting them,” Reddy added. IANS

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Filed under: Educational News, , ,

Urbanisation and health

Urbanisation and health

Cities have the potential for effective action in health and in improving the quality of life of its inhabitants. Cities must play a vital role to take new public health action particularly in developing health public policy and strengthening community action. Urbanisation is associated with many health challenges related to water, environment, violence and injury, non-communicable disease and their risk factors like tobacco use, unhealthy diets physical inactivity, harmful use of alcohol as well as risks associated with disease outbreaks. The problem is to create a political will for action; the challenge is to deploy the managerial skills and innovation required to pull together the vast human and other resources that a city processes to bring them to bear on the concept of a healthy city.

Urban health

Rapid urbanisation is due to natural growth in population and migration of people searching for better opportunities in cities. In general urban areas offer better education, jobs social mobility and services. However, many people who move to cities are trapped in marginal situations as a significant proportion of them are poor, have large families and are not well educated. The health of the urban poor suffer the most because of both living conditions and high cost of health services. The urban poor face illness and premature death from preventable diseases due to lack of safe drinking water, sanitation, health facilities, safety security, and health information.

Urbanisation and workers’ health

Health should be a right for workers. Health for all beings has been a cornerstone of health public policy, but workers who move into cities for economic reasons and to purchase better services, education and ultimately good health are comforted  by a number of conditions that instead create ill health; both for them and their families.

Human behaviour in complex urban settings

Cities are often centres of health education, research, technology and advanced services. But some of the lifestyle aspects of urban life are

contributing to the rising burden of non-communicable diseases in the region. The rapid pace of urban life may lead to neglect of nutrition and sedentary jobs invite lethargy and provide little physical stimulation; crowded living conditions ignite communicable diseases among the urban poor, as well as social tensions and stress; and heavy road traffic is part and parcel of city’s bustling life and commerce. Thus, the ongoing urban environment may take more away from the people’s health than it gives back – unless a conscious effort and planning are used to create healthy cities.

Healthy lifestyle

Healthy lifestyle can be created by making cities more liveable. Congested areas can be made more environment friendly by having these localities better planned, with more green spaces and safer neighbourhoods; education can be used to encourage healthier nutrition; parks and sidewalks enable healthy exercise and also make travel safer; and health workplaces promote a healthy workforce and also reduce accidents and the attendant social cost.

Urbanisation and injuries

The mixed nature of road traffic in many low and middle income countries – with bicycles, hand carts, motorcycles, pedal and motorised  three wheelers, cars, trucks and buses in varying proportions means that many of the technical aspects of planning, road design, traffic engineering and traffic management needs to be worked-out locally rather than imported. Moreover, there is no speed control specifically for urban areas. The increased use of motorcycles creates greater risk for pedestrians, cyclists and the motorcyclist themselves.

Rapid urbanisation leads to overcrowding transportation and dwelling beyond the planned occupancy. In cases of disaster, it can lead to high loss of life and injuries. Large number of casualties overwhelm hospitals and health facilities. In addition, many cities that have grown rapidly have not taken into account how the hazard make them more vulnerable.

Civil society has a responsibility. Let us rise to the of new world to enjoy the urban life and pay simultaneous devotion to nature and health.

Yasir Bashir

Class-X

Kendriya Vidyalaya

Baramulla

Filed under: Creative Corner-Students, , ,

Vitamin D is ‘nature’s antibiotic’

Topics:

Vitamin D is being appreciated as “nature’s antibiotic” as a string of recent discoveries about the multiple health benefits of this nutrient

Vitamin D is ‘nature's antibiotic’

Vitamin D is ‘nature’s antibiotic’(Getty Images)

for overall health.

But it is also one of those most likely to be deficient – especially during winter when production of the “sunshine vitamin” almost grinds to a halt for people.

Analogs of the vitamin are even being considered for use as new therapies against tuberculosis, AIDS, and other concerns.

And federal experts are considering an increase in the recommended daily intake of the vitamin as more evidence of its value emerges, especially for the elderly.

“About 70 percent of the population of the United States has insufficient levels of vitamin D. This is a critical issue as we learn more about the many roles it may play in fighting infection, balancing your immune response, helping to address autoimmune problems, and even preventing heart disease,” said Adrian Gombart, a principal investigator with the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University.

Among other findings about benefits of Vitamin D is the ones made by OSU scientists that it induces the “expression” of cathelicidin, an antimicrobial peptide gene.

This explains in part how it helps serve as the first line of defense in your immune response against minor wounds, cuts, and both bacterial and viral infections.

Experts believe advances in the use of cathelicidin may form the basis for new therapies.

“Vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency is a world-wide, public health problem in both developed and developing nations. Nearly one billion people world-wide are deficient,” the new report concluded.

The new report found that low levels of circulating vitamin D are associated with increased risk and mortality from cancer.

Vitamin D plays an important role in activating the immune system, fostering the “innate” immune response and controlling over-reaction of adaptive immunity, and as such may help control autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis.

The regulation of cathelicidin by vitamin D, a unique biological pathway for the function of vitamin D that could help explain its multiple roles in proper immune function, is so important that it’s only known to exist in two groups of animals – humans and non-human primates – and has been conserved in them through millions of years of evolution.

Epidemiological studies show a link between vitamin D deficiency and increased rates of respiratory infection and influenza, and it has been hypothesized that flu epidemics may be the result of vitamin D deficiency.

Higher levels of a protein linked to vitamin D have been associated with reduced infections and longer survival of dialysis patients.

Vitamin D has important roles in reducing inflammation, blood pressure and helping to protect against heart disease.

The study has been published in Future Microbiology, a professional journal.

Filed under: Health, ,

AMU scientist delivers lecture on Climate Change and Health

AMU scientist delivers lecture on Climate Change and Health
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Aligarh: “Climate change currently contributes heavily to the global burden of disease and premature deaths and there shall be an increase in the frequency of cardio-respiratory diseases due to increases in ground level ozone related toclimate change,” said CSIR Emeritus Scientist Prof. Rais Akhtar during a lecture on “Climate Change and Health” at the Department of Orthopaedics Surgery, JNMC, Aligarh Muslim University (AMU).

Prof. Rais Akhtar further said that the adaptive capacity needs to be improved everywhere as the impact of hurricanes and heat waves show that even high income countries are not well prepared to cope with extreme weather events.

The climate change has altered the distribution of some infectious disease vectors.

It has also increased the dangers of heat wave related deaths, increased malnutrition and consequent disorders, change in the range of infectious disease vectors and the burden of diarrheal diseases.

“Adverse health impacts of such changes will be greatest in low-income countries,” he added.

Those at greater risk include in all countries (urban poor, the elderly and children, traditional societies, subsistence farmers and coastal population). He said that the manner in which economic growth occurs and the growth benefits are distributed would be very important in shaping the health of populations such as education, health care and public health infrastructure.

Prof. Khalid Sherwani, while introducing the guest speaker said that Prof. Rais Akhtar, currently Emeritus Scientist CSIP, Geography, Centre for the Study of Regional Development, JNU, New Delhi has also taught at JNU, the University of Zambia, Lusaka and University of Kashmir, Srinagar.

Prof. Akhtar has received several highly prestigious awards including Liverhulme Fellowship (University of Liverpool), Henry Chapman Fellowship (University of London), Visiting Fellowship, University of Sussex, Commonwealth Secretariat Fellow, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, London, Visiting Professor, University of Paris.

Prof. Sherwani said that, “A number of highly acclaimed research papers of Prof. Rais Akhtar have been published in international journals of high repute and has already delivered a number of lectures around the world.”

Prof. S. Abrar Hasan, Dean Faculty of Medicine, Prof. A. A. Iraqi, Dr. Mohammad Zahid, Prof. M. Amanullah Khan, Prof. Imran Ghani, Prof. H. S. Khan, Prof. Rana Sherwani, Dr. Mazhar Abbas, Dr. Nayyar Asif, Dr. M. Aslam and a number of senior and junior residents, attended the lecture.

Filed under: Climate/Environment, , , ,

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Periodicals Articles Alert

Bachhon ko Nishulk Aur Anivaarya Shiksha Ka adhikaar Adhiniyam 2009, Pratiyogita Darpan,May2010,P.1823-1825 ; E-Kachara Prabandhan: Ek Chunauti Aur Upaye, Pratiyogita Darpan,May2010,P.1832-1834; Vitamin Truths & lies,Reader Digest,May2010,P.52-56; Surface Area and Volume, Education Trend,May210,P.65 ; Metals and Non Metals, Education Trend,May210,P.77; The rise of Nationalism in Europe, Education Trend,May210,P.91; Linear Equations in two variables, Education Today,May2010,P.5-15,Federalism, Sectors of Indian Economy and Water Resources Education Today,May2010,P.16-29 ; Acids, Bases and Salts, Education Today,May2010,P.30; Prehistoric Creatures,Tell Me Why,May2010; Disappearing Herbs,Out Look,May24,2010,P.56

Periodicals Arrival in the Library